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ResourcesEffective Leadership   

Personality Type and Leadership Behaviour

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Author: Anne Dranitsaris, Ph. D.
Price: $16.95 (PDF version)
Description:
Learn how personality affects leadership style and behaviour. Leverage this knowledge to become a more effective leader. Learn to work around - or minimize - potentially weak points. Identify steps to improve staff performance, build bridges in communication with and between various staff members, develop greater effectiveness in change management.

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Sample Chapter: INFJ as a Leader click [ ] to expand >>> Minimize

The INFJ Leader

This section provides information on how individuals of this personality type, in a team
environment, is most likely to behave. Each of the personality types adopts a particular way of
behaving in a team environment. In some circumstances, these behaviours enhance team
functioning, while in others, it can get in the way of a team achieving its objectives.
The following reflects the behaviours that you are most likely to see demonstrated by the INFJ as a leader.

The leadership style of the INFJ is different from that of the more commanding types. Directing
their people quietly yet forcefully, INFJs always strive for and support the highest and best use
of human potential. They genuinely care about their people and whether or not the people are
happy with their jobs. Demanding of themselves, they lead by example, never asking someone
to stretch any further than they would themselves. When they are in a position to lead people in
a cause, they are inspirational and know how to bring the best out of those who share their
values. They are less effective in keeping people churning out routine, detailed work.
INFJs often lead by becoming advocates of ideas or causes. They work toward their ideal in a
quiet fashion, working hard to gain the cooperation of others rather than demanding it. Able to
inspire and motivate people with their ideals, they work with steady determination to make
their insights real, and to reach long-range goals for themselves, others, and the organization.
They are also excellent team facilitators and can focus on both people and new ideas during
meetings.

As managers, INFJs tend to be interested in both people and productivity. They believe in
personal development for their employees and are skilled at helping them realize their goals, as
well as actualizing their own. Because of their empathetic capacity, they take great pride and
enjoy a type of vicarious pleasure in their subordinates’ accomplishments, almost as though
these accomplishments were their own. They are at their best in situations where, together with
their subordinates, they have the opportunity to excel and develop both personally and
professionally.

The developed interpersonal skills of INFJs make them supportive and appreciative managers
who are able to supply ample verbal and non-verbal appreciation, giving praise whenever they
find an appropriate opportunity. They let themselves become personally involved with their
workers, actively listening and giving their full attention to them. They always seem to know the
right thing to say and do to encourage and support others, getting personal gratification from
the exceptional performance of those whom they encourage. Also, they need and value the
approval of others, work hard to get it, and are motivated by positive reinforcement and
feedback.

INFJs enjoy having responsibility for the people under them and tend to manage in a very
personal fashion. They work very hard at establishing good interpersonal relationships with the
people for and with whom they work. They are team-oriented and direct much of their energy
into the creation of a well-functioning, harmonious team.

INFJs use their intuitive function to take in accurate information about the feelings, beliefs and
values of others, and weave them into a motivational tool for the different individuals. People
tend to work hard for INFJs because they feel known and special to them.
While an INFJ is loyal and will work hard toward achieving organizational goals, he/she does not
react well if people become cold, hard and impersonal. INFJs require and provide participative
management where changes, systems, and procedures are installed and operated for the
purpose of serving both organizational and human purposes. They will question anyone or
anything that comes from formal authority without first being passed through the ranks of
superiors, peers and subordinates for approval.

As managers, INFJs tend to be interested in both people and productivity. They believe in
personal development for their employees and are skilled at helping them realize their goals, as
well as actualizing their own. Because of their empathetic capacity, they take great pride and
enjoy a type of vicarious pleasure in their subordinates’ accomplishments, almost as though
these accomplishments were their own. They are at their best in situations where, together with
their subordinates, they have the opportunity to excel and develop both personally and
professionally.

The developed interpersonal skills of INFJs make them supportive and appreciative managers
who are able to supply ample verbal and non-verbal appreciation, giving praise whenever they
find an appropriate opportunity. They let themselves become personally involved with their
workers, actively listening and giving their full attention to them. They always seem to know the
right thing to say and do to encourage and support others, getting personal gratification from
the exceptional performance of those whom they encourage. Also, they need and value the
approval of others, work hard to get it, and are motivated by positive reinforcement and
feedback.

When organizational mandates temporarily fail to accommodate human needs, the INFJ
manager can experience enormous distress and conflict. They feels caught in the middle
because to follow the needs of the organization means that they will have to create disharmony
for their people. The conflict between organizational demands and human needs at times can
cause the INFJ manager to become ineffective and indecisive about which priority to choose.
INFJs tend to manage people and situations through their ability to listen and empathize. People
usually enjoy working with or for them, as they are particularly gifted in making people feel like
a team.

JTW – Personality Type and Leadership Behaviour © Anne Dranitsaris Ph.D. 2009

 
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